Tag Archives: APS

The crap that is Pronea!

I have tried, I have persevered. But this camera is truly crap. This is now the third one I have tried and no more. I don’t care how lovely your body has been designed, your insides are the devil. I see comparisons galore to all the greatest love stories, but no more. From now my head will rule my heart.

The third to die before the end of the roll.

This camera is so bad can’t even be bothered to write post on my computer and am using my phone app. Is there a camera you keep trying and it keeps disappointing you?

APS Film Double Exposures

Having seen some APS double exposures on Facebook and Instagram I decided to have a go myself. I have previously reused found APS film by moving the cartridge symbol back to one with a screwdriver. So I figured reusing a whole roll shouldn’t be that tricky either.

For the first trial I put the shortest roll of film I had, a 25exp 200iso Truprint, in a Canon IX7. I chose that camera as it is the only APS camera I have where I can override the film’s preset iso. I set the camera to an ISO of 80 and shot the first pass of the film in my garden and local park. I took photos of textures and nature. I really didn’t want to put too much effort into finding locations as I wasn’t sure it would work. The following day, while I was completing a Wherigo cartridge, I took the camera along for the second pass. The camera was still set at 80 iso. As all APS is out of date I wanted to overexpose the film slightly. If you use a regular point and shoot I actually think expired film could be used twice at its regular iso with no adjustments. For the second pass I took shots of buildings and street furniture. Again, I did not put much effort into the process.

So how did they turn out, these shots that I did randomly with little effort or planning?

Well not bad if I do say so myself 🙂

The magnetic aspect of the film seemed to assure that the two passes lined up perfectly. I think that would be true if you chose to use two different camera. I think that will be my next experiment. It certainly was easier to create these than with 35mm film in a camera without a multiple exposure feature. Plus this way you can use two different locations and times. With regular double exposures on film you have to take one straight after the other, not so with these. That gives a whole new scope to the genre.

Canon Ixus Z50 (ELPH LT260, IXY 220) APS

I obtained this camera in a pile of point and shoots along with some containing films. The film I tried in this one was a retrieved film. I took it out of a camera that was already on my list, used a screw driver to change the position of the indicator and reloaded it in this camera. The original camera’s counter was set at two exposures and the first two of this film were double exposed quite nicely so that left 23 of the Kodak Advantix Ultra for me 🙂

When I lived in Japan lots of the Canon APS cameras I found where named IXY, now they are Ixus as I am in Europe. They can also be called Elph, this camera from 2000 also has many names. You can find them here along with some extra details here.

It is tiny but feels well built. When you turn it on the flash pops up, but you can turn it off manually. I would say, if you are going to go for a small point and shoot APS camera, then this is a good one to try. Though I am sure the flash is not very powerful so it would be best to use it outside on a nice day.

I took my found film and camera on a trip to Huddersfield. It was my first visit there and I quite liked it, not that I would go back as the train journey back was a real pain but that was not Huddersfield’s fault. I was just unlucky with demonstrations and accidents.

The film didn’t do too bad considering it was left inside the original camera for an undetermined amount of time in undetermined conditions. This camera’s ISO cannot be changed so that did well too. A nice, small camera to keep in a pocket…except I have a few APS cameras of that description so it will be moved along.

Donated Black and White APS film

This is photo post as I want to show the reader who sent me two rolls of Kodak Advantix 400 black and White APS films a while ago. I was saving my last one for something interesting. Finally I have managed to use it, firstly at Ilkeston’s Heritage Fair. Then I finished the roll at Castle Howard where Country File was being held.

I put the film in my Canon ix7, which I feel is the best APS camera I own. I loved the results from this film.

Ilkeston

Castle Howard

As far as APS goes, these two rolls are probably the most successful. I think the grain and the monochrome really adds to the subjects. I really appreciated the chance to try it.

Thank you so much for the gift.

APS Kodak Advantix Black and White

I recently received a package from a reader, I love it when that happens. He sent me two black and white APS film cartridges.

I said thanks of course and promised to use it somewhere “nice’. I ended up taking it to Castle Hill and Almondbury, Huddersfield.

As this was ‘special’ film, I decided to use it in my Canon IX7 as it has an ISO override feature. The film is rated at 400, I set the camera to 200. I think I will set the next roll to 100 as it still turned out a little underexposed.

I think the photos lack contrast, but considering the age of the film they are not so bad. In my opinion the grain adds to the shots. I did a quick search and the film is still available from various places including Amazon, Ebay, and certain film supplying sites.

As for the hill, gosh it was windy. The hill overlooks the whole region and catches every bit of wind. I can’t wait to go back on a sunnier day for a picnic. BUT there are no toilets nearby, I do miss the lovely toilets in Japan. Always clean, always present.

Pentax Efina T (aps)

This is the second APS I have tried recently. This one is small, well built, solid. It feels like a quality piece of equipment in your hand. There is also a lot about it online, including all these technical details. The brushed metal finish of this 1999 camera makes you feel like, yeah…this is gonna work. And then you remember the film issue.

Anyway, here is this great looking camera.

And look at that tiny, tiny flash! I thought…That is never going to work and most of the reviews agreed with that thought. Oh well, I still like it.

I loaded it with Agfa Futura II and left it in my bag for ages…and ages, whipping it out when I remembered, testing the flash on Christmas day. It was just so small, it was easy to lose it at the bottom of a big bag. Then, when I finally remembered it again, I took it to Bradford.

Oh, if it only had ISO over-ride it would be super. Oh, if only there was fresh film it would be even super-er. But no. Great to hold, fun to use, not great for important photos.

Canon EOS IX7 (aps)

I have a heap of APS film and it is all out of date. What I need is a camera that allows me to select the ISO. Hello IX7. It was released in 1998 and it was a bugger to find anything about it on the net that had any useable details. I did find some technical details in Polish.

Using it reminded me of the Canon EOS 300 I have just tried. In fact, I even used the same lens on both cameras. The mode dial for both cameras is exactly the same. The only thing missing on this one was the multiple exposure function, shame as that would have been interesting.

I found using the camera easy, very intuitive. It did have a plastic feel to it, but it had a very pleasing look. I loaded it with Kodak Advantix 100 and set it to 25.

Here are some of the shots from that experience. I won’t subject you to the full roll as they are truly awful. APS film is really hit and miss, and this one was a big fat miss.

Sometimes I try to salvage films with a colour cast by changing it to black and white. With this film, it didn’t do much to improve anything, but it is interesting to see the results.

The next film I tried was a Centurian 200 which expired in 2005. I shot it at 80.

Wow, that came out much better. I did like using the camera, it responded well to everything I asked of it. The weight was comfortable, again comparable to the EOS 300. With fresh film, it would be outstanding. With the ever depleting film stock and my lack of funds, I probably will not be buying any APS film in the future, the prices are shooting up. The remainder I do have will more than likely be used with this camera due to the ISO function. The price of processing is quite reasonable though. I used Picture Lizard to develop these and it was just as cheap as 35mm colour, they did a good job too.

Chinon AP 600S (aps)

I can’t tell you anything about this camera apart from what you can garner from the actual casing and that it is produced in 1996.

It is a very, very basic aps camera. It has a cheap plastic feel. There is a focus aid light on the front, the regular print size selector on the top, a fill-in flash button, and a lens cover. It is powered by a CR2 battery which is most inconvenient and expensive for a cheap camera. I found no information about the aperture, but I think I can assume it is fixed. The label on the front says it has autofocus.

Really, I found nothing about this camera on the net apart from a few people trying to sell it.

I was so unimpressed by this camera just by looking at it that I put in a 15 exposure film and used it very quickly around my house and at a nearby castle ruin.

As with all APS film, the one I used was an expired one. The flash failed to fire sometimes, especially when faced with a backlit subject, the fill-in flash didn’t seem to have too much effect. The photos that did come out are fairly sharp, but the flash is quite ineffective. This camera would be fine outside on a bright day, but not really good for any other situation.

I really disliked this camera, it would be good for a single use camera if you have one aps film left. The one good thing about it is that you can throw it around without any care that it might get damaged.

SOLD