Photo Post: X-Processed Provia 100f with Drill Holes

I have been on summer break, with just a week to go. For the first time, I feel like it hasn’t been long enough. Usually, I am itching to go back to school, but not this time. I blame it on covid. I spend 180 days on furlough and now, no holiday is long enough. Anyway, I have taken loads of photos with a variety of cameras and in a variety of styles this holiday. This is one of the more experimental rolls.

I saw the style on the Instagram feed of someone I met on a photo walk. His feed is full of experiments and wonderful colours so I thought I would try one. Hence I ordered some expired 120 film and started drilling into it. He says he didn’t invent the technique, but he can’t remember where he saw it.

Once all drilled up, I loaded it into my Ikon Nettar and took it to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Once all finished I sent it off to Photo Hippo for X-processing. Literally the next day I got the download link and the day after the negs were returned.

Here are the results.

I love them. I definitely think I will try this again.

19 thoughts on “Photo Post: X-Processed Provia 100f with Drill Holes

  1. Toby says:

    I follow the same person on Instagram and don’t tell but I prefer your holy images. Yours seem smaller, and more random, actually thinking about it am sure one or two of his were drilled with a pattern in mind….maybe I’m miss remembering

    Like

      1. Darrell Meekcom says:

        Ace! But how come once the holes are drilled that the film doesnt becomes exposed due to light entry thro the holes??

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Peggy says:

        It does a little, but it is still tight and I put it back in the foil and box before I loaded it. Once in the camera it is light tight until it goes passed the red window..which on the nettar has a slide.

        Like

  2. Tony Kemplen says:

    These work really well, good to see the results from the whole film. Your holes look neater than mine! My favourite is the Robert Indiana numbers, but the portrait also works well.
    Do you think you’ll use this technique again?

    Liked by 1 person

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