Photo Post: Canonet

I hadn’t used this camera for a very long time, in fact not since the very first roll I put through it. I just didn’t gel with it for some reason. But couldn’t bring myself to leave it in Japan and brought it back to the UK in my luggage. After that, it sat in a storage box continuing to be unused. That was a shame, so I decided to send it to a new friend as I thought he would like to clean it up a little and maybe sell it to fund his own hobby. But a little time later the camera was returned. And returned looking and feeling very sparkly.

I immediately loaded a roll of APX 400 and took it for a walk on a misty day near my home, then on a trip to Blackpool to finish the roll. While there I met a few photo friends and one of them fell head over heels in love with the camera. I liked it and appreciated the work that had gone into it, but I suspected it would sit on my shelf again for another long period of time. I have so many cameras and a box full of new ones to try so it would get left behind. What a waste that would be! So I made a decision, I offered the camera to my friend. On the proviso, she wasn’t to sell it without getting in touch with me of course. Happy is not the word I will use to describe her response, more like ecstatic and disbelieving. But I was totally right, so far she has put more films through the camera than I ever did and has even taken it to Italy on holiday. The camera is now ever-present around her neck.

But what about my roll of APX, well here are some shots from that roll.

I wish I could link to a website or blog for my camera fixer friend as he really could charge for his services, but alas there isn’t one. He really is talented though. He does sell through eBay, so if I get a link for cameras he has fixed or spruced up I will add it here, with his permission.

7 thoughts on “Photo Post: Canonet

  1. Darrell Meekcom says:

    Fabulous camera Peggy! Flew off the shelves when first sold and rather high tech for the early 60s but I think that was a kind of turning point time for classy but affordable viewfinder and rangefinder camera design with the likes of the Fuji Automagic and Yashica’s. I dare say folk were enjoying their hols more shooting with these pretty reliable cameras rather than lugging around bulky slrs and lenses enmasse. Fantastic!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Peggy says:

      It really is a good camera and this one is even better now, but I felt it was as big and bulky as some SLRs. If you consider the pentax me for instance. I did prefer it to the smaller olympus trip though.

      Like

      1. arhphotographic says:

        Hi, thank you for your post. Perhaps you can help me . I would like to like this camera but have a rather unusual problem with it, details here -https://arhphotographic.wordpress.com/2022/04/24/trouble-with-a-canon-canonet-ql17/. Many thanks Andrew

        Like

      2. Peggy says:

        I actually read you article before and it is a mystery. With you putting the details here you might get an answer from someone else, but I am afraid I can’t help.

        Like

  2. Roger B. says:

    ARHphoto: Based on your detailed description, I suggest your camera simply does not work well with the newer, thin-backed films. I’ve experienced this with a couple of 1970s-era motor-advance point & shoot cameras myself. Stick to films that were designed when your camera was, and you should have no further problems.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Darrell Meekcom says:

    Message for ARHphotographic; Totally agree with Roger, the 1960s enamel film was a tad less flimsy. 2 further things to check 1) check the wind on sprocket teeth for 1 sided wear which will cause the film to slip and 2) try taking out the film support pad inside the main gate/door to take up the slack from your film, the sprung steel brackets on the pad might just need further tension, simply done by bending them out further. Hope that helps.

    Liked by 1 person

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