Photo Post: Return to Kiev 88


I love this camera. If it wasn’t so heavy I would take it everywhere.

This week I went camping in the Cotswolds for a few days, hence no posts. I will write more about the trip later. As I went by car, I decided to take the beast loaded with a donated film. I was careful loading it and managed to squeeze out 13 shots from the Ilford FP4 roll from 2007. I developed it in Rodinal, stand process.

I have to mention the fine gentleman in the photos. I was wandering Castle Combe when I noticed him sat on a bench. He didn’t look like a tourist so I asked if he was local, he was. He asked me if I liked history, I showed him my camera. He then asked if I had a few minutes spare, I did. So I sat next to him for 30 minutes or so and he told me all about the things he had found while metal detecting. Lots of roman coins and buckles.

Then he asked about my camera, this one. His parting gift was telling me about the photography museum nearby that I hadn’t known about. The visit to the museum made my whole holiday, so thank you kind sir, you are a gent.

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8 comments

  1. I love my Kiev 88 as well, can be quirky but gives great results!!! I also have the Kiev 60 which is a little easier for walking about!!!

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  2. Comparing your stand-developed Rodinal images to mine with the same Ilford emulsion, I note you get a broader tonal range, with better shadow and highlight detail, than I get. 1:100 Rodinal stand processing at 19 degrees C yields negatives closer to a high-contrast copy film than what you’ve shown us. Wonder what I’m doing wrong ….

    Liked by 1 person

    • It could be the scanning. I tend to adjust the curve before I scan?? Maybe the process… I processed mine a bit longer, 75 mins at 22 degrees. The first minute I agitate, then two inverts every 30mins.

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      • Thank you. I’ve been agitating the first 30 seconds, then a single turn at 25 minutes, then stop bath at 50 minutes. Very interesting that longer development at a higher temp yields a better contract curve – totally counterintuitive for folks who grew up using D76 and Microdol!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I am finding it works so much better than the quicker processes.

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  3. That fine gentleman is my Dad, Charlie and he will be thrilled that you enjoyed the museum! He was so happy to tell somebody about his finds, so you made his day. Thank you so much, Sarah.

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